Workplace dating boss

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Workplace dating boss

Office Etiquette or Office Manners is about conducting yourself respectfully and courteously in the office or workplace

First impressions are important! You are the ambassador/s of the business

Chewing gum and popping bubble gum in the presence of co-workers is neither cool nor dignified

Wear appropriate office attire, for example correct footwear, not thongs (flip flops) - they are strictly casual or beachwear

No exposed midriff to display tattoos and body piercing.

Be neat, clean and as conservative as the business requires you to be

We are put off by smelly people. So, be sure to shower regularly and use a suitable deodorant

Do not cough or sneeze in anyone's direction. Use a tissue, if possible, to contain the germs and then say "Excuse me"

The essence of good manners and etiquette is to be respectful and courteous at all times and with everybody

Therefore, treat your co-workers, cleaners, maintenance people and others with respect and courtesy

Good office etiquette is easily achieved by using common courtesy as a matter of course

Keep your interruptions of others to a minimum and always apologise if your intrusion is an interruption of a discussion, someone’s concentration or other activity

Show respect for each others workspace. Knock before entering

Show appreciation for the slightest courtesies extended to you

Brush up on your computer skills so that you can help others

Your employer would gladly invest $24.99 (Aust) to add this magnificent 500 page manual of Step-by-Step Computer Lessons to its reference library to improve staff efficiency

You will find help from some of the sponsors listed at the top or right side of this page. Check them out as well

Speak clearly without shouting. Loud people are a vexation

Say, “Please; Thank you; You’re welcome”, as part of your everyday courtesy

Be discreet and compassionate in your criticism of a co-worker

Do not try to sell things to your colleagues

Don’t hover around while waiting for a co-worker to get off the phone. Leave a note for them to call you or return later

It’s not a good idea to take your iPod to your office. It hinders communication

Avoid sexist comments about a co-worker’s dress or appearance

Surveys show that the office know-it-all proved to be the biggest gripe amongst co-workers. Don't be a know-all

Take responsibility for your mistakes, apologise and go about correcting the mistakes

Apologise if you are clearly in the wrong. If in doubt, apologise anyway. It’s no big deal

If your boss criticises your work, enquire about what precisely is wrong with it. Consider the comments, discuss them amiably if you disagree with the comments but defer to the bosses opinion if he/she is adamant

The boss always gets the benefit of the doubt. Don’t argue with the boss (however, there are standards of etiquette for employers too. See Employer Etiquette )

Make new employees feel welcome and comfortable around you. Don't be a busy-body

Office etiquette means being thoughtful when interacting with your peers

Show consideration for other people’s feelings

If there is conflict, do not get personal in your remarks

It is ruder still to not attend at all. Having a good excuse does not exonerate you

Do not dominate the meeting. All communication must take place through the chairperson

Pay attention to the proceedings quietly. Don’t shuffle your papers

Do not leave the meeting until it is closed by the chairperson

Always be particularly respectful to those older than yourself even if they are junior to you in position

Your elders are generally more mature in judgement and life’s experiences and this deserves your respect even in the workplace

Practice good manners and office etiquette at every opportunity; even in the toilet

Office Etiquette extends to the Office Kitchen which may be cleaned only once a day. If so, clean up after yourself so that the office kitchen remains clean, tidy and hygienic for those using the facilities after you

If we do not clean up our own mess we will collectively add to the mess and attract cockroaches and mice to crawl over the cutlery and crockery in the dead of night

Who knows what unspeakable bug we may pick up as a consequence

You are welcome to link your web site to our page "Office Etiquette" if it helps to spell out expected staff attitudes (smile).

Together we can build better harmony and cooperation in the workplace.

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We would love to hear about your experiences and views on our interactive visitors forum Office Etiquette (Workplace Etiquette) for possible inclusion in our rage page.